Conferences

Inland InfoLit Retreat Spokane, Washington 2016

Inland Infolit

Panel – Multimodality and Composition

Transitioning Between Written and Multimodal Essay:
The One-Minute Video Using iMovie

Students often view their writing as transactional, something to be assessed for a grade; they do not usually see the connection between composition and creativity (DeWitt). A solution: If students develop a “One-Minute Essay” in iMovie from their argumentative essay (incorporating images, music, voice-over, and video), instead of simply going through the motions of writing, students connect that relationship with the making of meaning. They then become more engaged in their work as they see their multimodal essay publication being viewed by an authentic audience: peers, parents, YouTube, or perhaps a campus competition. This “One-Minute Video” presentation includes assignment/rubric handouts.

DeWitt, Scott Lloyd. “Scott DeWitt on multimodality and engagement.” Online video clip. YouTube. June 11, 2012. October 14, 2016.

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CCCC Convention Tampa, Florida 2015

CCCC 2015

Panel – The Argumentative Essay: New Approaches to Innovative Research and Argumentative Essay “The Multimedia Essay”

Student-led online discussion totes the benefits of maintaining a “white-space” where students gather their thoughts before posting, motivates participation due to its technological draw, and acts as an equalizer in terms of gender, race, and ethnics. Even so, student-led online discussion often falls in the category of “a supplement to discussion in the traditional f2f classroom” or “a second best alternative when the traditional f2f classroom is not available.” I argue that (in addition to its totes) student-led online discussion stands alone outside of the traditional f2f classroom as a utopian space where the ultimate construction of knowledge occurs due to student awareness and implementation of critically reflective thinking processes. According to Suzanne E. Wade: “Critically reflective thinking involves rigorously examining the contexts of [any issue], framing, and reframing problems, generating a range of possible solutions, and evaluating those solutions on the basis of their likely consequences at the personal, academic, social, political, and ethical levels” (Wade 398). Built on Wade’s critically reflective thinking processes definition, this proposal seeks to show how student preparation, execution, and output before, during, and after online discussion creates the most efficient, collaborative, and supportive learning environment.

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East Central Writing Centers Association 2014 Miami University

ECWCA logo

Fostering a New History: The Next Generation of Writing Centers

Workshop- Rhetorics of Writing Center ‘Spaces’

The Writing Center: Sustaining Through Visual Rhetoric

While the economic sustainability of writing centers poses a unique and real problem with educational budget cuts, there remains another valid issue: the center’s visual rhetoric. Budgets will only sustain a writing center that attracts and engages students. In this digital age, most everyone envisions the topic of “visual rhetoric” as diverse arrays of textual composition. They may not consider the visual rhetoric (or any other rhetoric for that matter) of the “space” in which that composition occurs nor the effects of that space on composing. In actuality, the overall rhetoric of the space of a writing center sustains the mission of the writing center by offering a progressive place for composition to occur, thus meriting continued financial support.

This (1) hour workshop presentation proposes that financial support will come to writing centers when their rhetoric maintains the needs of writers, drawing writers to the center for its functional and physical appeal. I will take (10) minutes to share the history and result of a successful writing center grant acquisition at California State University, Stanislaus and the grant’s implementation of visual rhetoric at that university’s Writing Center. Referencing Foucauldian theory of power-play in spaces and Jinsop Lee’s “Design for all 5 Senses,” I will next spend (15) minutes focusing on Eastern Washington University’s new Writers’ Center discussing the rhetorical needs of this space within a learning commons and then showing what steps have been taken to make this space rhetorically inviting. Finally, as an inter-active workshop, the audience will spend (20) minutes sharing/assessing in small groups the space of their own writing center while then taking their rhetorical ideas to a virtual design space. The last (15) minutes of this workshop will be spent sharing those design space ideas with the larger group while posting comments to the web site that accompanies this workshop, a web site that will be used for visuals, application, and feedback. The goal of this workshop is to have attendees assess the rhetorical needs of their writing center, make rhetorical design changes in a virtual space, and save these ideas within the software to later share with attendees’ writing center directors.

Rhetoric of Writing Center Spaces PPT

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CCCC Convention 2013 Las Vegas, Nevada

CCCC 2013 logo

Panel – Critical Thinking and Writing in the First-Year Composition Classroom

Online Discussion: A Utopian Space for Constructing Knowledge

Student-led online discussion totes the benefits of maintaining a “white-space” where students gather their thoughts before posting, motivates participation due to its technological draw, and acts as an equalizer in terms of gender, race, and ethnics. Even so, student-led online discussion often falls in the category of “a supplement to discussion in the traditional f2f classroom” or “a second best alternative when the traditional f2f classroom is not available.” I argue that (in addition to its totes) student-led online discussion stands alone outside of the traditional f2f classroom as a utopian space where the ultimate construction of knowledge occurs due to student awareness and implementation of critically reflective thinking processes. According to Suzanne E. Wade: “Critically reflective thinking involves rigorously examining the contexts of [any issue], framing, and reframing problems, generating a range of possible solutions, and evaluating those solutions on the basis of their likely consequences at the personal, academic, social, political, and ethical levels” (Wade 398). Built on Wade’s critically reflective thinking processes definition, this proposal seeks to show how student preparation, execution, and output before, during, and after online discussion creates the most efficient, collaborative, and supportive learning environment.

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Computer and Writing Conference 2012 at North Carolina State University

As part of the Graduate Research Network (GRN)

Student Composition with Digital Technology:
Approach, Pedagogy, and Pragmatics

The NCTE in harmony with the WPA Council notes the necessity of holding consistent technological expectations for composition students (WPA). While much research occurred during the 1990s concerning the impact of digital [computer] technology on society, focused research needs to occur in the 2000s concerning the impact of digital [computer] technology on student composition. How do students approach and respond to the computer as a writing space? What behaviors, attitudes, and experiences do students embrace that effect how they compose? Once researchers assess student/computer relationships then administrators will be better equipped to address the additional issues of implementing pedagogical training with faculty development and the pragmatics of an infrastructure that makes technology available to all composition students.

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Computer and Writing Conference 2011 at University of Michigan


Postmen, Stewardesses, and the Semiotic Domain: (Un) Crossing Gendered Biases in the Computer as a Writing Space

“In trying to remove the sexism that is built into the language, why not, for example, just get used to thinking of postmen and stewardesses as both female and male?” (Blair 45). In this inter-active presentation, the audience will utilize pencil and paper in conceptualizing innovative designs for hardware, interface, and language that neutralize prevailing gendered biases in the computer as a writing space semiotic domain.

http://webservices.itcs.umich.edu/drupal/cw2011/

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Computer and Writing Conference 2010 at Purdue

Fresh Text: A New Perspective on Text Messaging in the Composition Classroom

Most professors perceive non-negotiable communication boundaries between their ‘space’ and their students’ ‘space,’ and find text messaging communication to be an interruption in the teaching process. However, ignoring the opportunities afforded by utilizing text messaging in instruction hinders progress in the composition classroom. Text messaging creates avenues of positive Foucauldian power-play as students and professors share a virtual space, a new area of student/instructor empowerment.

http://www.digitalparlor.org/cw2010/cfp

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NCWCA 2010 Mercy High School, Burlingame, CA
Northern California Writing Centers Association

The Writing Center:  Sustaining Through Rhetoric

When defining “sustain,” the Oxford English Dictionary states:  “To keep (a person or community, the mind, spirit, etc.) from failing or giving way” (OED).  While the economic sustainability of writing centers throughout California poses a unique and real problem with educational budget cuts, there remains another valid issue that requires attention:  the center’s visual rhetoric.  Budgets will only sustain a writing center that attracts and engages students towards a writing “self-actualization.”  In this digital age, most everyone envisions the topic of “visual rhetoric” as diverse arrays of textual composition.  They may not consider the visual rhetoric of the “space” in which that composition occurs nor the affects of that space on composing.  In actuality, the visual rhetoric of the space of a writing center sustains the mission of the writing center by offering a visually progressive place for composition to occur, thus meriting continued financial support.

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Computers and Writing Conference 2009 at Davis

GRN 2009 Davis
Graduate Research Network

Fresh Text: A New Perspective on Text Messaging in the Composition Classroom

While most professors perceive non-negotiable communication boundaries between their space and the space of their students “outside of class,” ignoring the opportunities afforded by utilizing text messaging as part of instruction systematically hinders progress in the composition classroom. Text messaging between professors and students creates new avenues of positive power-play. As students engage in contacting their professor via texting, they appropriately de-center authority in the classroom while inviting professors into their “space,” a whole new arena of valuable student empowerment. This bond of communication encourages contact when students need to inform their professor about their attendance or request help on an assignment, especially vital as they write their essays. Professors conveniently engage students with information such as ideas in response to earlier questions in class. Epiphanies pertaining to improved composition come and go, but texting communicates them before they are gone. Encouraging text messaging between the professor and students opens up communication on a higher and more responsive and professional level in the composition classroom.

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Comments
  1. Kathy says:

    2009/12/30 at 5:54 pm
    This thesis was accepted to the Computer and Writing Conference to be held at Purdue in May of 2010.

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